Wii U, nouvelle console hors norme

trumspringa

dictionaryofobscuresorrows:

n. the temptation to step off your career track and become a shepherd in the mountains, following your flock between pastures with a sheepdog and a rifle, watching storms at dusk from the doorway of a small cabin, just the kind of hypnotic diversion that allows your thoughts to make a break for it and wander back to their cubicles in the city.

Via The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows

trumspringa

dictionaryofobscuresorrows:

n. the temptation to step off your career track and become a shepherd in the mountains, following your flock between pastures with a sheepdog and a rifle, watching storms at dusk from the doorway of a small cabin, just the kind of hypnotic diversion that allows your thoughts to make a break for it and wander back to their cubicles in the city.

Via The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows

trumspringa

dictionaryofobscuresorrows:

n. the temptation to step off your career track and become a shepherd in the mountains, following your flock between pastures with a sheepdog and a rifle, watching storms at dusk from the doorway of a small cabin, just the kind of hypnotic diversion that allows your thoughts to make a break for it and wander back to their cubicles in the city.

Via The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows

trumspringa

dictionaryofobscuresorrows:

n. the temptation to step off your career track and become a shepherd in the mountains, following your flock between pastures with a sheepdog and a rifle, watching storms at dusk from the doorway of a small cabin, just the kind of hypnotic diversion that allows your thoughts to make a break for it and wander back to their cubicles in the city.

Via The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows

trumspringa

dictionaryofobscuresorrows:

n. the temptation to step off your career track and become a shepherd in the mountains, following your flock between pastures with a sheepdog and a rifle, watching storms at dusk from the doorway of a small cabin, just the kind of hypnotic diversion that allows your thoughts to make a break for it and wander back to their cubicles in the city.

Via The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows

defranco:

Ahhh good ol Colbert.


Via I am Philip DeFranco


parislemon:

Speaking of the Steve Jobs biography, its author, Walter Isaacson, has written a piece for Time on Jobs’ passing, titled simply: American Icon. 

Writes Isaacson of his last meeting with Jobs for the book, just weeks ago:

As a writer, I was used to being detached, but I was hit by a wave of sadness as I tried to say goodbye. In order to mask my emotion, I asked the one question that was still puzzling me: Why had he been so eager, during close to 50 interviews and conversations over the course of two years, to open up so much for a book when he was usually so private? “I wanted my kids to know me,” he said. “I wasn’t always there for them, and I wanted them to know why and to understand what I did.”

You can find the article online here, but it’s only for Time subscribers right now. Otherwise, it will be available in a special commemorative issue with one last Steve Jobs cover (above).

And here’s the story behind the cover.



In our culture, we’re suspicious of strangers. They’re a threat. They lurk in shadows. On the Web, however, strangers are the source of everything worthwhile. Strangers and their utterances are the stuff of the Web. They are what give the Web its matter, its shape, its value. Rather than hiding in our tents and declaring our world to exist of the other tents near us — preferably with a nice tall wall around us — the Web explicitly is a world only because of the presence of so many strangers.

word

David Weinberger, linked from an older post on Caterina’s blog (via cacioppo)

Via Fred Wilson Dot VC

logicrovers:

Good morning


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